Monday, June 25, 2012

Sea-level rise along East Coast faster than thought

The News-Observer reports
From Cape Hatteras, N.C., to just north of Boston, sea levels are rising much faster than they are around the globe, putting one of the world's most costly coasts in danger of flooding, government researchers report.

U.S. Geological Survey scientists call the 600-mile swath a "hot spot" for climbing sea levels caused by global warming. Along the region, the Atlantic Ocean is rising at an annual rate three times to four times faster than the global average since 1990, according to the study published Sunday in the journal Nature Climate Change.
The story continues
Those estimates became an issue in North Carolina recently when the Legislature proposed using historic figures to calculate future sea levels, rejecting higher rates from a state panel of experts. The USGS study suggests an even higher level than the panel's estimate for 2100.
Meanwhile, the radical North Carolina legislature continues to push legislation that would constrain the Coastal Resources Commission from considering the full range of evidence and modeling in projecting sea-level rise for regulatory purposes.

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