Tuesday, February 12, 2013

The Audacity of Nope

Showing his own profile in discourage, North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory agreed with Republican legislators that the state should not expand its Medicaid program nor run its own health exchange. His feeble excuse is that the state is too feeble.
Gov. Pat McCrory doesn’t think the state is ready to expand Medicaid or ready to run its own health exchanges – two provisions of the Affordable Care Act.

McCrory’s office made the announcement Tuesday morning just hours before the state House is supposed to take up a bill that would bar the state from participating in those two actions. The Senate passed the bill last week.
According to the Governor, NC is not ready for better health and longer lives for hundreds of thousands of its most vulnerable citizens, tens of thousands of jobs, more productive workers, billions in economic output, and billions in savings in hospitals' uncompensated care.

Apparently, the Governor's last few years in the political wilderness have left him tanned, rested, and not ready.

4 comments:

Collards said...

Well said from down under.

Dave Ribar said...

I like to think of it as adding a truly Southern perspective.

Bob Grenier (@bubbanear) said...

"NC is not ready for better health and longer lives for hundreds of thousands of its most vulnerable citizens, tens of thousands of jobs, more productive workers, billions in economic output, and billions in savings in hospitals' uncompensated care."

NC is not ready to believe those wildly off kilter claims.

John Hood puts these claims in their proper perspective:

"Next time, ladies and gentlemen, please read the fine print and do some independent thinking before passing along half-baked talking points as fact."

We have yet to discuss the very real likelihood that NC will be left holding a rather large bag when the Federal subsidy for the Medicaid expansion disappears in short order.

Bob Grenier (@bubbanear) said...

More from Hood:

"This is a critical point: there is no free lunch here. Paying for Medicaid expansion has an economic cost. An expansion financed by a combination of federal tax hikes, Medicare cuts, and state tax or budget changes means that some jobs will be created among providers serving Medicaid patients and other jobs will be lost. As Conover notes, nationwide the result will be worse than a wash – the Medicaid expansion will reduce net employment nationwide. But for individual states, the extent of that job loss will vary according to circumstances and level of participation.

"In effect, the debate about Medicaid expansion and jobs in North Carolina is a debate about reducing our net job loss from Obamacare.

It’s not about increasing employment from current levels. The only way to get a real increase in employment would be to repeal and replace the law."


Here's the Chris Conover article in Forbes that Hood cites.

Excerpt:

"Thus, policymakers and informed citizens always need to be on alert for exaggerated claims regarding the benefits of Medicaid expansion. For the nation as a whole, the jobs picture is unequivocally worsened, not improved, by the massive expansion of Medicaid. For individual states, the conclusion is less clear. But even states that appear to be gaining jobs on balance need to remember that these benefits are gained at the expense of poorer health among the near-poor who will be forced away from private coverage through exchanges onto the rolls of Medicaid."

Of course, this leads to a discussion of access to healthcare under Medicaid, a problem it shares with the expnsion of non-Medicaid health coverage under the so-called "Affordable" Care and Patient "Protection" Act.